Tapper World Tour HD – Best iPad App for Bartender

tapper world tour ipad game app

Tapper World Tour HD – Best iPad App for Bartender. For you who are really love the remake of a ’80s arcade game, Tapper World Tour, you can soon find it in French, German, and some other countries in Europe. This game was made on 1983 by Square One Games and published by Warner Brothers with the original name Tapper by Bally Midway. The objective of this game is quite simple. You will be a virtual bartender that serving specific drinks to your customers, collecting empty glasses, and pick up your additional tips. This game will be more difficult through the entire game and each stop. You have plenty of bar counters that is need to be served.

You will find four new stops in this great ipad game: Paris, Munich, Dublin, and Corsica with a total of 40 levels, 201 new patrons, 12 new beverages, 4 new entertainment, and a bartender that is having a headache. Of course you can’t get the new stop without a powerup, and it is Lane Freeze. If you already past the South America, this Europe portion is said to be taking 40% of the total content.

tapper world tour ipad game app

By Collecting tips, you will earn lives which will be taken away if you displease each customer or leave an empty glass to shatter. You can also get the power ups by building your score multiplier. Beside for iPad with iOS 4.2 or later ($0.99), this Tapper World Tour HD ipad game is also available at iPhone and iPod Touch with iOS 4.0 or more ($.99).

2 Replies to “Tapper World Tour HD – Best iPad App for…”

  1. These new elements fit right in with the classic Tapper gameplay in Tapper World Tour, making for some frantic and extremely challenging fun. One thing that is a huge improvement over the original is the use of touch screen controls. Simply tapping the taps works incredibly well for serving drinks, and tapping on the screen to move between the different bar counters allows for much quicker reactions than you could get with physical controls. There’s an option for a virtual d-pad and button for a more traditional feel, but I definitely think you’re at a disadvantage when using this control setup.

  2. How big an influence has Tapper—the 1980s video game in which a mustachioed barkeep must keep a tavern full of barflies well-lubricated—had on my world view? A beer stand at the Oakland Coliseum that I frequent on game day features an inelegant set-up where the server scurries back and forth between the counter and the tap, trying to placate an ever-growing queue of customers. “Whoever came up with this design has clearly never played Tapper,” I will say to anyone who will listen to me, which, I’m sure you will understand by now, is hardly anyone.

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